5 Tips to Endure the School Year | Orlando Family Counseling

When August comes around, mixed feelings begin to stir in parents, teachers, and students. Many dread the end of summer while others are chipper and eager for the first day of school. Everyone has the intention to kick off the school year strong, but what really happens? Typically August and September are excellent months, but as October, November, and especially December creeps in, our vigor dwindles until we are itching for Christmas break to finally arrive. How can we endure as the school year proceeds?

school year

Here are 5 simple tips to help parents, teachers, and students maintain their vigor to the very end.

  1. Be Organized. – Organization is key to decreasing stress and anxiety whether you are parent, teacher, or student .We tend to feel overwhelmed because we do not have any form of organization to keep track of our busy lives. Everyone has their own style, so the method you choose will look different than the next person but use a method! Any type of organization is better than no organization. Whether it is meticulous planning, task listing, having scheduled reminders on your phone, or even writing your to do list on your hand! Use an organizational method that works well and stick to it.
  1. Get enough sleep. – When we lack sleep we are unable to function to our full potential which causes us to be more susceptible to sickness and making mistakes. Our bodies do not have the time to fully reboot and recover with limited sleep. We initially believe that cutting out X number of hours of sleep for that project, assignment, etc. is worth it, but in the end the lack of self-care will limit us. One way to create good sleep hygiene is to implement a sleep schedule. When you are on sleep schedule you create a pattern for your body to follow and regulate. Once the routine sets in, you will feel tired during the expected time you head to bed and alert at the regular wake up time.
  1. Maintain good nutrition. – Make sure you are eating at least three balanced meals a day. It is important to take note what is going into your body. When busyness sets in, we often skip meals here and there and then stuff ourselves with whatever is fastest. Our bodies need food to run well and without it, like sleep, we will be functioning below average. Taking a 15-30 minute break to eat may make all the difference to your overall day. There is a reason why the term “hangry” was created, the combination of the words hungry and angry. It is also important to be watchful of the types of food you are eating. Heavy carbs and artificial sugar can increase fatigue rather than recharge. Make sure to refuel with helpful foods such as nuts or fruits to boost energy.
  1. Have a little fun. – It is important not to get caught up and consumed by the work tsunami. It is interesting how we relish in relaxation during the summer but somehow throw it out the window during the school year. It is important to engage in regular leisure time, not just with mindless and entertaining activities. Designate a time at least once a week to engage in a hobby that will revive you for the following day or week. Balancing work and fun is imperative to endure the school year.
  1. Take it day by day.- Take each day as its own and focus on what that day brings. I am not discouraging planning out your week, that is counter-intuitive to my first tip. It is good to plan and think about your week, but do not let it consume your thoughts. Prioritize what is needed today and focus on those points before jumping to the next 4 days.

Sometimes we just need to be more attentive to our lives instead of being swept away by the tornado of the school year. If we are able to maintain these simple steps, it can do wonders to decrease our irritability, anxiety, stress, and overall outlook on others and ourselves.

Colleen headshotAbout Colleen: Colleen values the importance of a comfortable and non-judgmental atmosphere. At the heart of her work, she seeks to create a safe environment in which clients can feel at ease while working through life’s difficulties. Her specialty is working with women and adolescents struggling with anger management, trauma, and substance abuse problems. She also enjoys assisting those facing multicultural or racial issues. She is dedicated to equipping clients with practical skills to better manage and reduce symptoms such as anger outbursts, anxiety, or restlessness. Ultimately, her goal is to help clients uncover the source of their distress so that they can begin to heal. See Colleen’s full bio.