TV.  Not a day goes by that we don’t see pregnant Kim Kardashian sporting a designer outfit emphasizing her growing baby bump on covers of magazines or on entertainment (OK, I really hate the words “baby bump” but, hey it’s what they are calling these little miracles these days.)  Celebrity pregnancies are exciting and often portrayed as glamorous, as in the case of Princess Katherine, and we can’t help ourselves from following their every move for nine months.  After the baby is born, we become obsessed with pictures of their little one and following the celebrity’s journey to getting back to their pre-baby weight.

PregnancyWhat bothers me most about the publicity of celebrity pregnancies is the magazine headlines that often criticize these women for either gaining weight while pregnant, or, not losing the weight fast enough after the birth of their child. The opposite is also true when Supermodels who gave birth just six-weeks prior are modeling lingerie down a catwalk.  What kind of messages do these negative headlines and images send to pregnant women and new moms about added weight during and after pregnancy?  Unfortunately, those headlines and images are what sells product and makes money for celebrities and isn’t reality for us regular women.  Gaining weight during pregnancy IS reality and weight gain within proper limits for your personal body weight is normal and healthy for both you and your little miracle.

Avoid the negative headlines and airbrushed photos of celebrities post-baby and take control of your own healthy pregnancy by following these 3 tips from the USDA’s www.choosemyplate.gov website, along with your physician’s guidelines, that may help you select healthier food choices while expecting your little miracle:

  1. Focus on nutrition!  Because your vitamin and mineral needs are increased while pregnant, you will want to choose foods from each food group that provide you with these extra nutrients.  Vitamin A found in orange-colored fruits and vegetables (cantaloupe & sweet potatoes), Vitamin D and calcium found in low-fat dairy, potassium (beans & peas), and iron and folic acid (fortified whole grains) are important nutrients you will want to make sure you are consuming plenty of now and after your baby is born.
  2. Avoid Consuming “Empty Calories”.  Empty calories are calories from added sugars and solid fats in foods like soft drinks, desserts, fried foods, cheese, whole milk, and fatty meats. Look for choices that are low-fat, fat-free, unsweetened, or with no added-sugars.  They have fewer or no “empty calories.”
  3. It’s OK to be active.  As long as your doctor approves, you can try squeezing in up to 2 ½ hours of physical activity each week as you feel up to it.  Walking and gardening are great sources of low-impact exercise but try to limit it to 10 minutes at a time spread throughout the week.

HealthyPregnancyRemember, your pregnancy is a special time and taking care of the little miracle growing and developing inside you is your number-one priority and should not be influenced by the unrealistic images of celebrities it seems we will never be able to avoid.  Follow the guidance of your physician and consult a Registered Dietitian for help with a proper diet plan that is customized for you and your baby’s needs both during pregnancy and after.  Once your baby arrives, take your time losing the extra baby weight.  You need some extra energy anyway if you choose to breastfeed your baby.  That beautiful glow you radiate is far more beautiful than any celebrity image and deserves its own headline any day.

To good health!